Google Assistant Launches New eCommerce Features

by Sean Ogino |

Google Assistant Launches New eCommerce Features

Google Assistant

Google is clearly aware of the incredible growth in e-commerce. To exploit it meticulously, over the years it has undertaken several successful ventures in e-commerce and payments, including Google Shopping, a mobile wallet, and delivery through Google Express. Once again, in order to successfully monetize Google Assistant–their AI voice assistant that made its debut at Google I/O 2016–Google is extending its voice-enabled commerce.

At its developer conference in Mountain View, CA, Google announced that it is bringing commerce features to its voice-based digital Google Assistant. While it’s already enabled conversational commerce for select retail partners, it seems like they’re vastly extending their offerings. Google Assistant can now order, accept payments and complete the delivery as well. Google Assistant’s new e-commerce features also ensure shoppers’ identities, and send notifications and purchase receipts.

This move is viewed as a follow-up move to Google enabling shopping with its retail partners on Google Assistant back in March. Google Home allows customers to order things from Walgreen’s, Costco, or Toys R Us through Google Express. Customers just have to say commands and set up a payment option by going into the Google Home app settings. It looks something like this-

google assistant 1

Clearly, Google could have announced these new e-commerce features with the announcement of Google Home. But the intentions behind these efforts, apart from monetization, are clear. One of them is the need to catch up with the rivals. Google Assistant already helps customers in organizing their shopping lists and find out about things in which they are interested in, but it had stopped short at actually letting them buy items. But with Google Home and these new functionalities, Google is trying to overcome that lacuna as quickly as possible. Voice-enabled shopping is one of the prime reasons why Amazon’s Alexa is leading the pack when it comes to conversational commerce. Besides, Amazon has its own payments infrastructure and a grand network of warehouses and delivery services to get products to people who place voice-based orders.

Additionally, Google is going to integrate an inventory search option into Google Assistant, and it’ll be free for marketers. Recode notes, “In traditional Search, marketers pay for an ad feature that similarly shares results for nearby sellers that have in stock the item a user is seeking. The feature that is coming to Assistant pulls from the same data as the ad option already offered in traditional Search.”

“This feature for finding specific items nearby is different from asking Assistant the location of a specific store nearby; for example: “Okay Google, where is the nearest CVS?” That option is already available on Assistant, and businesses are not charged for inclusion.”

Moreover, the announcement also revealed Google’s plans to integrate Google Assistant into a slew of consumer devices. It may work with devices from Sony, Panasonic, and others to control them with the Assistant and even bake it into the device itself. A special “Google Assistant built-in” badge will highlight appliances that include that capability. It is also believed that Google Assistant’s new e-commerce features will be available in French, German, Japanese, and Brazilian Portuguese, as well as Italian, Spanish, and Korean, by the end of the year. Now, these developments will help Google in broadening its new features’ reach to posit itself as a serious player in the online shopping contention.

Clearly, Google Assistant’s new e-commerce features are a strategic branching out of its core functionalities and strengths. And its effect will be felt on improving Google’s competitive edge as well as monetization prospects, as it’s always a big plus for a company if it can find more revenue channels through the existing features. If it can become an integral part of people’s online buying behavior, those effects won’t be too hard to realize!

Advanced eCommerce SEO and PPC Marketing Tactics and Philosophies

ecommerce seo and ppc

We recently caught up with Ron Dod, CEO of Visiture, a top ecommerce SEO and PPC agency. He answered our questions about how to boost visibility and conversion in this complex ecosystem…

1. Tell us a little about Visiture and how you help ecommerce businesses.

Visiture was founded over 10 years ago as a search engine marketing agency focused on the ecommerce space. It might sound fancy, but, when it comes down to it, what we do is simply help online merchants sell more products using search engines. I came onboard in October 2015, after merging my old agency, Grey Umbrella Marketing, with Visiture in order to strengthen their SEO service and provide PPC services that I was not offering.

Getting more into what we do, we help merchants utilize Google’s organic listings (SEO) and optimize their AdWords accounts (PPC) in order to increase their returns from their search marketing campaigns. When it comes to PPC, we have a lot of very advanced strategies, from Inventory Driven Search and Google Shopping Data Optimization to more, which enable us to get higher returns. On the SEO side, we have a tried and true content and outreach team that creates very compelling content, promotes it to the right people, and works to get high-quality links, which is the 2nd most important Google ranking factor most online merchants do not focus on.

2. eCommerce SEO and PPC have been crucial tactics for quite a while, and, while Google Shopping is newer, it’s clearly very established. What’s new in these three areas?

Search engine marketing has been around since the late 90s and was adopted by the larger retailers. At that time, not too many people were using search engines to find products and services. Flash forward to today and 81% of people research online before they buy. So, in today’s market, most retailers and merchants are focusing on it on some degree; but to say it’s important is an understatement for retailers and online merchants.

While SEM is constantly changing, for the most part, the large objective has been the same since the late 90s. For SEO, you still want to focus on creating the best customer experience on your website so that Google will place you higher in the SERPs. For PPC, you want to be focusing on advertising to someone when they are looking to buy, not research. As I alluded to above, 81% of people research online before they buy, which means you could be buying a lot of clicks and spending a lot of money for someone who is just doing research. Focusing on the long-tailed approach, below, is the best course of action for PPC.

ecommerce seo and ppc

What is new in the industry is fairly groundbreaking. I did this study about a company called Fashionnova.com. If you don’t have time to read the whole study, I’ll summarize it for you. Basically, they were able to outrank these gigantic brands and go from 5,000 keywords in Google to 83,5000 in a little over a year. It was the largest jump that I have ever seen, and we looked into everything to find out how they ranked so much higher than everyone else.

We found that their backlink profile was worse than their competitors, their on-page efforts were poor, and, from a traditional SEO perspective, they weren’t really doing anything right. What we did find was they had more than 6.3 million Instagram followers, and their Alexa score said they had a 21% lower bounce rate and a 4-minute more on-site time. Basically, Google was placing them higher because consumers were interacting positively with Fashionnova.com. While it was confusing from a traditional SEO viewpoint, it makes sense—Google wants to put the best listings, with which people have a positive interaction, in the SERPs.

visiture ecommerce seo and ppc 2

This shows us that the new thing regarding SEO is to focus on the customer experience and try to ensure that users click on your organic listings, don’t bounce back to the SERPs, and then stay on your site longer. This will help it rank higher in the organic search engine results.

When it comes to PPC, there are constant changes when it comes to best strategies and tactics. Recently, Google implemented expanded text ads, so merchants are still recovering from that. However, the biggest shift in the industry has been Google Shopping. Today, Google is placing Google Shopping results on almost every single eCommerce-related search. Google loves to make money, so, of course, they are going to be slipping in their ads wherever possible. This means that retailers and merchants really need to be focusing on Google Shopping optimization.

How you optimize your Google Shopping campaign is really on a case by case basis, but using SKU multiplications has been working very well for retailers. I would definitely say that everyone is getting better results with Google Shopping. Most retailers aren’t just plugging their Google Shopping campaigns into AdWords, anymore. They are doing data optimization, so, if you aren’t correctly optimizing your Google Shopping product feed, you can quickly be outpaced by your competition and miss out on a key part of your marketing mix.

3. How do Google Shopping and ecommerce SEO and PPC relate to and support each other?

That’s a great question. A lot of people think of the three as completely separate disciplines, and, while they are distinct, they work best together. If you are doing SEO, then it is highly recommended to use PPC data, in some regard, to help your SEO campaign. It could be using high-converting keywords to focus with on page optimization or to better understand trends, seasonality, or more.

While most people consider Google Shopping and PPC to be very similar, Google Shopping is almost more a mix of SEO and PPC. You can’t tell Google what you want to show up for when someone searches. You are at Google’s mercy because they decide where to place you in the Shopping results, based on the information your product feed provides them.

We are seeing this renaissance, where PPC professionals are starting to learn basic SEO on-page optimization tactics in order to optimize product feeds to get better performance. The lines between the three are becoming more blurred and assimilated. But, overall, it is important to remember that they are separate entities and becoming a master in all three can be very difficult.

4. How is bidding on Google Shopping different from PPC ad bidding?

Google Shopping is similar to PPC when it comes to bidding, but the biggest difference is that you cannot choose what you show up for, compared to PPC, where you have much more control over where your ad is served. A very good strategy to use for Google Shopping is to break up your products into product “buckets” or groups. The idea is that you use software or manually break up your products into similar groups. You can also add negative keywords to eliminate advertising spend in your Google Shopping campaigns.

This is not a perfect science, but it is the best we have right now. Another item to do is really dig into your product titles and descriptions in your product feed. You can use a software management tool to help you optimize this data dynamically, to either show up for more search queries or more accurate ones.

Google crawls your product titles and descriptions so make sure that they are accurate. Otherwise, you might show up for a bunch of unrelated searches. For example, you might have an American Flag design Arm Brace as a product. You might end up showing up for unrelated searches such as “arm casts” or “American flags.” You can see how Google might think this is good, but we would not think those three are relevant at all.

negative keywords

5. What should sellers be doing to optimize their product feeds?

I alluded to a lot of the tactics above, but the main three right now are below:

  1. Title and Description Optimization – Optimize your titles and descriptions dynamically or statically in order to show up for more searches.
  1. SKU Multiplication – Expand your product feed, and take your products and multiply them to change the titles and description in order to rank for different phrases. You can do this one by one, but I would highly suggest using a software program to do this to save time.
  1. Negative Mining – Continue to add negative keywords to your product buckets so that you stop showing up for useless keyword phrases which make no sense for your campaigns. Using software, you can do this dynamically and easier; however, manually is fine in some situations.

By doing this, you can definitely gain an advantage over your competitors.

6. What are some of the differences between the major ecommerce platforms and how they affect sellers’ SEO tactics?

In my opinion, the big three platforms for retailers and online merchants are Shopify, BigCommerce, and Magento. There are bigger ones for larger retailers, i.e., Demandware, but I find these three are the most common. When you really dig into the platforms, none of them really own a competitive advantage over each other. They are all fantastic platforms. It really just depends on the merchant and the needs they have. The same can be said when it comes to SEO—they are all great. Shopify uses a “collections” category page that you have to adopt, but, other than that, it is very solid.

In reality, they are all fantastic, and you can’t go wrong with any of them. Outside of those three, you can get into a lot of problems with other eCommerce platforms, like site structure, canonical tags, and more. But, in general, platforms have taken a huge step forward in the past three years.

7. What are some overlooked best practices for ecommerce SEO?

Everyone tends to focus on one of the most important factors in Google, which is content, but no one really focuses on the other two—links and RankBrain, which have the biggest opportunities for retailers and merchants. We are going to see a huge shift in the industry, to those two ranking factors, and more people adopting link building again.

It seems like a lot of people tried to write off link building, but it is coming back into play, and the retailers that invest in it are winning big. Also, in the future, RankBrain is going to become larger, and more merchants will focus on it once we understand more about it and how to optimize for it.

8. What about PPC–what are some important tips to remember?

PPC can be time-consuming and frustrating, but my biggest tip is just to not give up on it. A lot of the times you are just buying customers, so the return can be poor. Remember, if you acquire a customer through PPC, calculate the lifetime value of that customer, and then estimate your returns. Otherwise, it will look very unprofitable, and you might give up on it while your competitors are buying customers and growing their businesses.

9. What are some typical challenges for your clients and how do you address them?

Unfortunately, no one ever comes to us when things are going well. The largest problems we solve are usually:

  • Organic search engine rankings are decreasing
  • Search engine traffic and sales are decreasing
  • Changing agency vendors due to performance
  • Some sort of Google penalty

There are even more than that, but those are the main challenges. Our job is to correct the ship and get it back on the course of profitable growth with search engine marketing!

10. If anyone has questions, whom should they contact?

Feel free to email me directly: ron@visiture.com––I would love to help however I can!

6 Consumer Research Tools You’re Probably Not Using

Consumer Research Tools

The final buying decision of a customer is not usually straightforward. It gets shaped by various forces, be they cultural, social, psychological, and economical. Understanding how these factors prompt or repel people from buying is needed if marketers wish to succeed. The reason is that once you know the “actual” facts about the consumers, you can decide what consumer segment  needs to be on your marketing radar and, more importantly, how to get their attention. Consumer research, thus, is like a lighthouse for your marketing efforts. It gives direction to everything that marketers do.

Today’s marketers, especially ecommerce marketers, are lucky in a sense that they are living in a world where information about customers is never far away from them. Along with their own database, the market is flooded with tools which can further simplify their process of consumer research. Though there are plenty of such tools, I have listed down some of the most innovative consumer research tools.

1) Reddit

Reddit, a social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website, reaches over 200 million unique visitors each month from over 208 countries. This means that the chances of the presence of your desired target audience are very high here. Apart from being free, it boasts a presence of multiple communities called subreddits, groups of people that discuss common topics. This is precisely where the possibility to peep into the consumers’ mindsets arrives for marketers.

With the help of Subreddit Search Tool, you can search your keywords to find your audience on reddit. Suppose that you are selling nutritional products. Then, you might type in “nutrition” to bring up a list of subreddits related to that topic.

reddit

After combing through the top results in the subreddit, you can see the popularity of the post.

reddit upvote

As you can see, two of those top spots are taken up by talk of energy and nutrition. Now, through this you can understand what they are thinking about the overall nutritional products and industry. If you think that you have a product which can meet their expectations, you can target them accordingly. Remember that Reddit isn’t called the front page of the internet for nothing!

2) Google Trends 

Google is regarded by many as one of the most powerful consumer research tools. Its Google Trends feature in particular gives you an unobscured picture of how often particular keywords or subjects have been searched over a certain time period. Of course, you can check the keyword related to your brand as well as the keywords of your competitors – that too in a real time. As it gives refined results by location, category and search history along with the cause of the sudden rise in interest for few keywords, it tells you what people find more interesting, what is on their mind for most of the time and what they love the most.

google trends

3) Ratings and Reviews

Ratings and reviews is one of the most direct consumer research tools, as it gives marketers valuable insight into what their own customers think of their products, service, and brand. While it’s illuminating to visit third-party review sites and read reviews about competitors, you’ll get the most data as efficiently as possible by mining your own product review platform.

Your review solution should be able to do sentiment alerts and/or analysis, merchandising reports, and segment reviews based on issues pertaining to categories like fit, defective product, and shipping.

Click here to learn more about optimizing your ratings and reviews!

4) Social Data

Facebook has already become much more than a mere social media platform where people connect. As of the third quarter of 2016, Facebook had 1.79 billion monthly active users. Thus, Facebook’s massive repository of data makes it perhaps only second to Google in terms of the most powerful consumer research tools.

This data made it simple for the social media giant to come up with its own Facebook Audience Insights- a tool that is available to anyone through the Ad Manager interface. It’s an incredible way for marketers to gain access to data Facebook is gathering about its users. It is more useful to brands both that want to-

  • Use Facebook heavily for interacting with their audience.
  • Learn as much as possible about their core demographics.

The best part of this data is that Facebook provides it in a proper format of  graphs and other descriptive summaries by staying away from the irritating spreadsheets. It enables to provide you with the bird’s-eye view of your chosen group. And generally, this is what matter the most while making important marketing related decisions.

fb audience insights 2

You can also get valuable data from a social login solution. Social login lets your customers create an account and sign into your site using their existing profiles from platforms like Facebook, Google, Amazon, and more. It’s one of the most convenient consumer research tools, as it delivers social graph data about your customers and site users directly to you. Many social login clients use the solution to get data about the following:

  • Social network popularity: e.g., do your customers live on Facebook or do they choose Google?
  • Device use: See if shoppers are using desktops, tablets, or smartphones to order from you
  • Age
  • Gender
  • Region
  • Interests/likes

Read on below for more on consumer research tools…

5) Think with Google Marketer’s Almanac

Customers’ choices, and thus, trends change according to the seasons. Think With Google’s Marketer’s Almanac allows you to gather information on how people browse and buy according to seasonality. As it is able to tell  the slightest change in consumer behavior according to seasons, so you can catch the pulse of people by staying relevant. This, among all other consumer research tools, is especially valuable for those marketers whose businesses get severely affected by the seasonal fluctuations.

6) Customer Loyalty Data

A good customer loyalty program will act as a treasure trove of consumer information. In it, you’ll have your shoppers’ contact information, birthdays, and purchase history at the very least. You should also be able to pull in purchase data like recency, frequency, and average order value. With an optimized advocate loyalty program, you’ll be able to pull in advocate marketing data as well, including whether or not customers referred friends, submitted reviews, and so on. All in all, your customer loyalty program is one of the most comprehensive consumer research tools, as it can give you the following data to both analyze and segment:

  • Purchase recency, frequency, and average order value
  • Customer loyalty and advocate marketing data
  • Location of purchase or delivery
  • Type of product purchased
  • Interactions with your brand in-store, online, in-app, or on social
  • Any data imported from your CRM, ERP, ESP, or personalization engine

All of the aforementioned consumer research tools can show you vital insights, such as age group of consumers, their geographical location, their lifestyle, and more. What makes them even more desirable is that you can get hold of such valuable information without spending much. Many of these consumer research tools are free, and the ones that aren’t do double duty as acquisition, conversion, and retention solutions. The significance of this cost saving becomes startling when placed against the contradiction of paid consumer research.

Note: To learn more about all the information you can collect in your online or omni-channel customer loyalty program, don’t miss out on this post!. And this article will show you what to do with your advocate marketing data!

Google Pop-Up Shop to Launch in New York

google pop-up shop

Fresh off its October 4 hardware announcement, Google broke the news that it’s opening up a pop-up store in Manhattan. The Google pop-up shop will open in conjunction with the release of the company’s hotly anticipated new hardware products, including its first phone–the Pixel–and its Amazon Echo competitor–Google Home.

Google has dabbled in hardware before with products like the Chromebook and its ill-fated Google Glass. These and other ventures–some very successful and others not–were sometimes promoted with pop-up shops. What’s different about this time?

In terms of the products, the Pixel is the most exciting, as it’s the first phone completely made by Google itself. Google Home is notable because it’s another competitor to Amazon’s pioneering home assistant, and is made by a company that has mastered data (sorry, Alfie).

Google Home will be sold in the Google pop-up shop.
Google Home will be sold in the Google pop-up shop.

This leads us into the other thrilling facet of the Google pop-up shop–we’re witnessing an internet emperor move into physical goods and brick and mortar. Consequently, this could be the start of something very exciting and boundary-breaking for tech and retail, or Google might be beaten back online. Additionally, since they’re launching new products and not just revamping old favorites, it makes sense to get customers used to these new offerings by showing them off in stores. After all, it’d take a lot of faith in a brand to buy a $650 phone online without trying it.

Google's Pixel phones.
Google’s Pixel phones.

Pretty much all commentators are lining up the Google versus Apple comparisons at this point. After all, Google’s new focus is on being a vertically integrated hardware business, much like the home of the iPhone. Apple proudly recognizes that differentiated in-store experiences command profits, and the Google pop-up shop experiment is sure to strive to reach that bar.

Google's Daydream View Headset will also be at the Google pop-up shop, allowing shoppers to experiment with VR.
Google’s Daydream View Headset will also be at the Google pop-up shop, allowing shoppers to experiment with VR.

TechCrunch notes that it seems probable that the Google pop-up shop might move to a new location at some point, or will be replicated in different cities. Analysts also speculate that it’ll remain open through the holidays. This is a relatively unknown space for Google, and we’ll be sure to keep you updated on their journey over the next few months!

To learn more about differentiating your store, look at our post, 9 Innovative Examples of In Store Technology! And don’t forget about our latest FAQ sheets, in which our Customer Success Team tells you everything you need to know about Ratings and Reviews and Social Login!

eCommerce News Update: Twitter-Google Team Up, What is Mobile?, and Brian Williams “Misremembers”

3 Reasons On Why You Should Not Ignore Twitter

News update, because we all need more of those. A recap of the news of the week; from the top stories in the ecommerce and social media world, to articles that makes us take a step back and think about the way we approach marketing and how we engage customers.

twitter-promoted-tweets

Twitter and Google Teaming Up Again

Twitter is expanding the reach of its Promoted Tweets in a two-fold effort to boost advertising revenues and expand their core base of engaged users. The move gives brands and retailers the opportunity to significantly expand their reach beyond the already expansive Twitter audience. This broader reach means brands and retailers need to pay even closer attention to their Twitter interactions to ensure they’re getting the best return on their investment. Check out the blog next Wednesday for the next installment of “Effective Use of Social Media for eCommerce” series, featuring tips for strong Twitter engagement.

What is mobile?

With the sales of traditional tablets leveling out, popularity of convertible devices like the Surface Pro 3 growing, and mobile phones rivaling tablets in size, the definition of “mobile” is fluctuating. It is an interesting area to consider in terms of consumer behavior; how, when, and where consumers are using their devices and making purchases. However, what stands true is the variety in mobile devices, platforms, and technologies. What’s critical for retailers is the importance of mobile responsiveness and user experience on these devices. Your commerce site must be responsive to any and all sizes of mobile devices. No matter the definition of mobile or where majority of your revenue is being generated (online or offline); your interactions with customers whether on your site or through social commerce must be possible and optimal on a mobile device.

“Misremembering” – A lesson in the Importance of Trust

Brian Williams’ recent “misremembering” of his experience in the grounding of a military helicopter during the 2003 invasion of Iraq is a lesson in honesty and transparency. Although the story will be quickly replaced by another scandal, his reputation may not recover as quickly. This is an important reminder for retailers and brands in remaining honest and transparent with consumers. According to Lithium 53% of consumers say they won’t buy from a company they don’t trust. And with the widespread growth of user generated content, trust has become more important than ever.

The Battle of Facebook and Google+

Lately, there has been a lot of buzz about the competition between Facebook and Google+, so we thought we would lay all the facts out on the table. With over 350 million active users, Google+ surpassed Twitter and is coming in at second place behind Facebook. Who will come out on top? And most importantly, which network … Read more

How Businesses can Implement Trust in Social Media

Everyday more and more businesses are making the switch over to social media. Businesses that have made the switch over to these social media network platforms have already acquired many benefits. Some of these benefits include higher influence and awareness with your brand, and growth in engagement with consumers. With benefits there is one key … Read more

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